what I Learned from my first-time interview with a newspaper reporter

This post originally appeared on SheWrites.com. I’m sharing with fellow writers should you and your writing be in a similar situation when embarking on promotional opportunities. 

I few weeks ago I contacted an editor at Pioneer Press (local publication and sub of Chicago Tribune) to tell him I was a writer and I had something to share with my community (see #5). He was interested. I followed up and sent him a copy of The Magic of Memoir. A reporter called me a week later with a request for a telephone interview about the book, my writing and my memoir. I learned a few things from this first-time experience. Here are my takeaways for those of you who may find yourself facing a first-time for any promotional opportunity.

  1. Prepare before the interview. I thought preparing for the interview was unnecessary as I would be okay shooting from the hip when answering the reporter’s questions; I knew my topics intimately. But I should have prepared. Preparing would have affirmed that I hit my talking points and that I didn’t leave out anything important I wanted to say. I should have made a cheat-sheet of anticipated questions, (How long have you been writing? What’s your memoir about? Why memoir?  How did you get involved with MofM?) and their answers. I wouldn’t have had to second guess myself after the interview asking, “What’d I just say?” if maybe I had a cheat-sheet in front of me while being interviewed.
  2. Slow down. I knew I was going to be recorded and as soon as I heard the reporter flip the switch something happened to my forthcoming conversation. I started to talk too darn fast, deeming my babble unimpressive, lacking clarity and conciseness. I should have paused after asked a question, thrown in a couple, “umm’s” or “let’s see’s” to give me time to organize my thoughts and ensure I actually answered the question – which leads to #3
  3. Answer the question. Yes, I admit perhaps nerves dictated the direction of my conversation with my subconscious telling me to reel myself back in. My goal was to speak as clearly as I knew I could write. I doubted I had made my goal. I would have kept my thoughts on track with clear speech and concise points if I stuck to the answer to the question. 
  4. Prepare for after the interview. Write questions YOU may have for the reporter. I forgot to ask when the interview was going to be published, if it was going to be in surrounding suburban papers, online too, and the length of the interview in print. I wouldn’t have been surprised to see that just a wee portion of all my talk had made it in print if I had been knowledgeable, post interview.
  5. Use print editors as contacts. Some background. A couple of months ago, the editor I had contacted had printed a request to readers asking what kinds of stories they wanted to see in the paper. I told him I believed residents have much to share as they are an integral part of their community and that I wanted to see more stories about who the residents are, what they do, and how they are involved in the community. I also included that I was a writer and suggested there was a pool of fellow writers among us. Fast forward to a couple of weeks ago when I emailed him, reminding him of what I told him in a few months ago and that I now had something to share. He was interested! I sent him a copy of MofM, a pitch letter, bio info, and press page. A week later, a reporter called. My takeaway here is to make every effort to contact print media editors, as letters to the editor, comments about a reporter’s article, in disagreement to a writer’s column or as feedback requested by an editor to the paper’s readers. Establishing a print editor as a contact along the way could make a difference in getting a print editor’s attention and consideration in the future.

This was a great experience in pitching to print editors and talking about my writing. I have been practicing writing memoir for many years and now I’m working on polishing self-presentation skills by referring back to my 5 lessons learned.